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This page is broken down into two sections. The first are advertisements featured in the back of the 1907 edition that is the basis for our digital edition. The second section is period advertisements for the book itself.

Advertisements from the book:


Send for

BENJ. R. TUCKER’S
Unique Catalogue of
Advanced Literature

THE LITERATURE
THAT MAKES FOR

EGOISM IN PHILOSOPHY
ANARCHISM IN POLITICS
ICONOCLASM IN ART

128 pages, representing more than 400 authors and listing nearly 1,000 titles, besides being enriched by about 600 pithy and epigrammatic quotations, of an Anarchistic and Egoistic character, from some of the works catalogued.

Benj. R. Tucker carries the most complete line of advanced literature in the English language offered for sale at any one place in the entire world.

All books listed in his catalogue are carried constantly in stock, and may be seen at

Benj. R. Tucker’s Bookstore
225 Fourth Avenue, Room 13
NEW YORK CITY


LIBERTY

BENJ. R. TUCKER, Editor

An Anarchistic journal, expounding the doctrine that in Equal Liberty is to be found the most satisfactory solution of social questions, and that majority rule, or democracy, equally with monarchical rule, is a denial of Equal Liberty.

APPRECIATIONS

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ERNEST H. CROSBY, author of “Captain Jinks, Hero“:
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ADDRESS:
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BY
Emile Zola

TRANSLATED FROM THE FRENCH BY
BENJ. R. TUCKER

In this story Zola takes four typical marriages,—one from the nobility, one from the bourgeoisie, one from the petite bourgeoisie, and one from the working people,—and describes, with all the power of his wondrous art, how each originates, by what motive each is inspired, how each is consummated, and how each results.

A new edition from new plates, and at a reduced price.

Price, 10 cents


CARLOTTA CORTINA

BY
FRANCIS DU BOSQUE

A very remarkable story of New York’s Italian quarter,—in fact, one of the best short stories ever written in America.

Price, 10 cents


Here’s Luck to Lora
AND
OTHER POEMS

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WILLIAM WALSTEIN GORDAK

Mr. Gordak comes entirely unannounced, but his verse speaks well for him. He is a natural poet who writes evenly and melodiously of the beauties of nature and the daintier side of love. Nothing in his little book is cheap. His muse has a lofty flight, and his teachings uplift.—Oregonian, Portland, Ore.

PRICE, ONE DOLLAR


The Anarchists

A Picture of Civilization at the Close of the Nineteenth Century

BY
JOHN HENRY MACKAY

Translated from the German by
GEORGE SCHUMM

PRESS COMMENTS

New York Morning Journal.—”‘The Anarchists’ is one of the very few books that have a right to live. For insight into life and manners, for dramatic strength, for incisiveness of phrase, and for cold, pitiless logic, no book of this generation equals it.”

St. Louis Republic.—”The book is a prose poem.”

Cloth, One Dollar; Paper, Fifty cents


JOSIAH WARREN

The First American Anarchist

A Biography, with portrait

BY
WILLIAM BAILIE

The biography is preceded by an essay on “The Anarchist Spirit,” in which Mr. Bailie defines Anarchist belief in relation to other social forces.

Price, One Dollar


The Philosophy of Egoism

BY
JAMES L. WALKER

(Tak Kak)

My nose I’ve used for smelling, and I’ve blown it:
But how to prove the RIGHT by which I own it?

Schiller, freely translated

“No more concise exposition of the philosophy of Egoism has ever been given to the world. In this book Duty, Conscience, Moralism, Right, and all the fetiches and superstitions which have infested the human intellect since man ceased to walk on four feet, are annihilated, swept away, relegated to the rubbish heap of the waste of human intelligence that has gone on through the progress of the race from its infancy.”—Liberty.

Cloth, 75 cents; Paper, 35 cents


Slaves to Duty

BY
JOHN BADCOCK, JR.

Assailing the morality superstition as the foundation of the various schemes for the exploitation of mankind. Max Stirner himself does not expound the doctrine of Egoism in bolder fashion.

Price, 5 cents


State Socialism
AND
Anarchism

How Far They Agree and Wherein They Differ

BY
BENJ. R. TUCKER

The opening chapter of “Instead of a Book,” reprinted separately. The best pamphlet with which to meet the demand for a compact exposition of Anarchism.

Price, 5 cents


The Attitude of Anarchism
TOWARD
Industrial Combinations

BY
BENJ. R. TUCKER

An address delivered in Central Music Hall, Chicago, on September 14, 1899, before the Conference on Trusts held under the auspices of the Civic Federation.

Chicago Chronicle.—”The speech which roused the most intense degree of enthusiasm and called forth the greatest applause at yesterday’s sessions of the trust conference fell in rounded periods and with polished utterance from the lips of a professed Anarchist.”

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Price, 5 cents


MUTUAL BANKING

BY
WILLIAM B. GREENE

Showing the radical deficiency of the existing circulating medium, and the advantages of a free currency; a plan whereby to abolish interest, not by State intervention, but by first abolishing State intervention itself.

A new edition, from new plates, of one of the most important works on finance in the English language, and presenting, for the first time, a portrait of the author.

Price, 10 cents


CHARLES A. DANA’S
PLEA FOR ANARCHY

Proudhon
and
His “Bank of the People”

BY
CHARLES A. DANA

A defence of the great French Anarchist; showing the evils of a specie currency, and that interest on capital can and ought to be abolished by a system of free and mutual banking.

The series of newspaper articles composing this pamphlet appeared originally in the New York “Tribune,” of which Mr. Dana was then managing editor, and a little later in “The Spirit of the Age,” a weekly paper published in New York in 1849 by Fowlers & Wells and edited by Rev. William Henry Channing. Editor Channing accompanied the publication of the series by a foot-note, in which he stated that the articles had already appeared in the “Tribune,” but that “Mr. Dana, judging them worthy of being preserved in a form convenient for binding, has consented to revise them for our paper.”

Price, 5 cents; in leatherette, 10 cents


The Ballad of Reading Gaol

By C. 3. 3
[OSCAR WILDE]

A poem of more than 600 lines, dedicated to the memory of a trooper of the Horse Guards who was hanged in Reading Gaol during the poet’s confinement there. An English classic.

Cloth, One Dollar; Paper, Ten Cents

The cloth edition has covers of blue and vellum, and is beautifully printed from large type on hand-made antique deckle-edge paper. It is a sumptuous book of 96 pages, and should be in every library.

PRESS COMMENTS

Albany Press.—”Strong writing, almost too strong; it is horrible, gruesome, uncanny, and yet most fascinating and highly ethical…. One of the greatest poems of the century, a permanent addition to English literature…. It is the best Lenten and Easter sermon of the year.”

Brooklyn Citizen.—”Many of the stanzas are cries out of the lowest hell. The poem, indeed, takes rank with the most extraordinary psychological phenomena of this or any time.”

Indianapolis Journal.—”The work is one of singular power, holding the reader fascinated to the last line. Nothing approaching it in strength has been produced in recent years.”

Philadelphia Conservator.—”People who imagine themselves superior to the prisoners in jails should read this poem. People who love invasive laws should read this poem. People who think existing governmental methods of meeting social invasion civilized should read this poem. People who do not know that laws may make as well as punish crime should read this poem. In fact, everybody should read this poem. For somewhere it touches everybody, accuses everybody, appeals to everybody.”


God and the State

BY
MICHAEL BAKOUNINE

TRANSLATED FROM THE FRENCH BY
BENJ. R. TUCKER

“One of the most eloquent pleas for liberty ever written. Paine’s ‘Age of Reason’ and ‘Rights of Man’ consolidated and improved. It stirs the pulse like a trumpet-call.”—The Truth Seeker.

Price, 15 Cents


Free Political Institutions

Their Nature, Essence, and Maintenance

AN ABRIDGMENT AND REARRANGEMENT OF
LYSANDER SPOONER’S “TRIAL BY JURY”

EDITED BY
VICTOR YARROS

One of the most important works in the propaganda of Anarchism

CHAPTERS

I.—Legitimate Government and Majority Rule. II.—Trial by Jury as a Palladium of Liberty. III.—Trial by Jury as Defined by Magna Carta. IV.—Objections Answered. V.—The Criminal Intent. VI.—Moral Considerations for Jurors. VII.—Free Administration of Justice. VIII.—Juries of the Present Day Illegal.

Price, 15 cents


A Blow at Trial by Jury

BY
BENJ. R. TUCKER

An examination of the special jury law passed by the New York legislature in 1896. A speech delivered by the editor of Liberty at a mass meeting held in Cooper Union, New York, June 25, 1897, under the auspices of the Central Labor Union, Typographical Union No. 6, and other labor organizations. Distribution of this pamphlet among lawyers and legislators will tend indirectly to interest them in Anarchism.

Price, 5 cents


Instead of a Book

BY A MAN TOO BUSY TO WRITE ONE

A FRAGMENTARY EXPOSITION OF
PHILOSOPHICAL ANARCHISM

Culled from the writings of
BENJ. R. TUCKER
EDITOR OF LIBERTY

With a Full-Page Half-Tone Portrait of the Author

A large, well-printed, and excessively cheap volume of 524 pages, consisting of articles selected from Liberty and classified under the following headings: (1) State Socialism and Anarchism: How Far They Agree, and Wherein They Differ; (2) The Individual, Society, and the State; (3) Money and Interest; (4) Land and Rent; (5) Socialism; (6) Communism; (7) Methods; (8) Miscellaneous. The whole elaborately indexed.

Cloth, One Dollar; Paper, Fifty cents


MAILED, POST-PAID, BY

BENJ. R. TUCKER, P. O. Box 1312, New York City.


Advertisements for the book:

 

Ego-Ad-Edited


Advertisement found in "The Public" Vol. X No. 487, August 3rd, 1907


Unique_Catalogue_of_Advanced_Literature-612


A 1982 advertisement for Rebel Press (UK) edition of Max Stirner’s “The Ego and Its Own,” with an introduction by Sidney E. Parker. This advertisement pulled from Libertarian Microfiche Project archives (PP 1423).

Bibliography

In this final section of TheEgoAndHisOwn.com we will relay bibliographic detail and history of the book in its various iterations for the first 100 years in the English language. With the advent of print-on-demand publishing by computer algorithm, there is a proliferation of poor facsimiles, in addition to some poor editions put together by humans. We will give credit to Verso Press, who has recently put out a very nice, retypeset edition that stands out from the rest.

  1. Publishing History 
  2. Print Advertisements

Publishing History

This is an attempt to chronicle the English language translations of Max Stirner’s Der Einzige und sein Eigenthum. We limited it to the first century of English editions, between 1907 and 2007.


1907

EgoCover-1907-BenjRTucker

Publisher: Benjamin R. Tucker
Translator: Steven T. Byington
Publisher’s Preface: Benjamin R. Tucker
Introduction: James L. Walker
Translator’s Preface: Steven T. Byington
Index: Yes
City/Country: New York, USA
Size: 4.5×6.75″ Pages: 506
Title: The Ego and His Own

UoE Notes:
The first english language edition of Stirner’s book. Until now, only fragments had been published, translated by a small number of people. The plates from this Tucker edition were used for every known edition until the 1965 Libertarian Book Club edition.

There was a “standard” and a “deluxe” edition of this book. The “deluxe” edition had a green cover and gilt edges. Any copy is rare.

Includes a catalog of other books published and sold by Tucker.


1912

Max-Ego-Fifeld

Publisher: A.C. Fifield
Translator: Steven T. Byington
Publisher’s Preface: Benjamin R. Tucker
Introduction: James L. Walker
Translator’s Preface: Steven T. Byington
Index: X
City/Country: London, UK
Size: xx Pages: xx
Title: The Ego and His Own

UoE Notes:

Fifield has published Benjamin Tucker’s “State Socialism and Anarchism”.

This is a UK edition printed using the same plates as the 1907 edition. In the September 1907 edition of Liberty, it was stated:

“While in Europe, I was fortunate in making arrangements with Mr. Arthur C. Fifield, proprietor of the Simple Life Press, 44 Fleet street, London, whereby he becomes sole importer for Great Britain of The Ego and His Own and most of my other publications. English friends who desire to be promptly and readily supplied should apply to Mr. Fifield.”


The_Ego_and_His_Own-21913

Publisher: A.C. Fifield/E.C.Walker
Translator: Steven T. Byington
Publisher’s Preface: Benjamin R. Tucker
Introduction: James L. Walker
Translator’s Preface: Steven T. Byington
Index: Yes
City/Country: New York, USA / London, UK
Size: 4.5×6.75″ Pages: 506
Title: The Ego and His Own

UoE Notes:
This would at first appear to be a reprint of the 1912 edition, as the cover is identical, but the title page lists Fifield and Walker as co-publishers.


1915

Ego1915cover

Publisher: A.C. Fifield/B.R.Tucker
Translator: Steven T. Byington
Publisher’s Preface: Benjamin R. Tucker
Introduction: James L. Walker
Translator’s Preface: Steven T. Byington
Index: Yes
City/Country: New York, USA / London, UK
Size: 4.5×6.75″ Pages: 506
Title: The Ego and His Own

UoE Notes:
This would at first appear to be a reprint of the 1912 edition, as the cover is identical, but the title page lists Fifield and Tucker as co-publishers.

 


1918

Boni-Cover

Publisher: Boni & Liveright
Translator: Steven T. Byington
Introduction: James L. Walker
Translator’s Preface: Steven T. Byington
Index: No
City/Country: New York
Size: 4.25×6.5″ Pages: 387
Title: The Ego and His Own

UoE Notes:
Part of the “Modern Library” series, the image to the right was found on the internet showing a rare cover. This edition is re-typeset and drops both the introduction by Tucker and the index. The editors have seen three different “states” of this book, and modernlib.com claims it was in print from 1918-1928.

It’s possible that there are up to four printings of this title with four different dust-jackets, though this writer has never seen a dust jacket version for sale. A collector of Modern Library editions is looking for help incollecting information on them here: http://www.modernlib.com/authors/sAuthors/StirnerJackets.html


1921

EgoGape

Publisher: Jonathan Cape
Translator: Steven T. Byington
Introduction: James L. Walker
Index: X
City/Country: London, UK
Size: xx Pages: 506
Title: The Ego and His Own

UoE Notes:
Very little is known about this edition. The title page shown to the right was pulled from a sale listing, and it shows that it, at least, was retypeset from the original. One listing referred to “brown cloth covers”.


1963

EgoCover-1963-LibertarianBookClub

Publisher Libertarian Book Club
Translator: Steven T. Byington
Introduction: James J. Martin
Index: X
City/Country
Size: xx Pages: xx
Title The Ego and His Own: The Case of the Individual Against Authority

UoE Notes:
The sub-title came into being on this edition and is credited on the copyright page to Joseph Spivak.
The Libertarian Book Club edition relaunched “Ego” into the popular culture, after a 40 year hiatus of being in-print.

In the spirit of the “Adulterer’s Bible”, this writer has dubbed the LBC edition the “Party First Edition.” On page 155, in the footnotes, it reads:

PartyFirst-EgosForOCR-1020801

We see that books that merely produce facsimile copies based on the LBC edition repeat this typo: Dover (1973 and 2005), Rebel Press, Western World Press.

Fascimile

Inside flap copy:
This is the first edition of Max Stirner’s universally-known libertarian classic to appear in English in forty-five years, in fact, the first in any language to come forth since the end of the First World War. A world poisoned by decades of totalitarian war has begun to review the origins of the anthill society which has turned out to be the real logical consequence of the herd-forces launched by the French Revolution, with its nationalism, majority-group tyranny and conscription, and of Marxian and other coercive collectivisms, including the 20th century state capitalist forms. Part of that reappraisal has resulted in the rediscovery of Marx’s formidable contemporary opponent Stirner, and the complacent feeling of Marxians that the former had disposed of Stirner for all time has been badly shaken.

As Herbert Read observed in an essay commemorating the centennial of Stirner’s The Ego and His Own (the German original, Der Einzige and sein Eigentum, bore the publication date 1845, though it really was in circulation in the last months of the year previous), “the giants whom Marx thought he had slain show signs of coming to life again,” and Stirner is one of them. The fact that Stirner was the real antithesis of Marx (and, incidentally, of Hegel) has long been ignored, blurred, or suppressed, though Sidney Hook, in his durable From Hegel to Marx, emphasized that in their controversy, Marx and Stirner were discussing “the fundamental problems of any possible system of ethics or public morality.” How a number of lesser figures have been posed as Marx’s prime antagonists over the years is a tribute to the determination to escape the far more uncomfortable and demanding Stirnerite alternative.

James L. Walker, in his introduction to the original English language edition in 1907, declared that “In Stirner we have the philosophical foundation for political liberty.” This is amply borne out by Stirner’s point-blank repudiation of all isms and dogmas, his tireless restatement of the necessity for self-liberation, for refusal to become mobilized and immolated by the juggernaut of Church, or State, or the “Society” of the secular mythmakers. “Stirner shows that men can make their own tyrants as they make their own gods,” Walker observes, “and his purpose is to unmake tyrants.”

The famed author and critic James Gibbons Huneker (1860-1921) in his essay on Stirner published in 1909 stated without reservation that The Ego and His Own was “The most revolutionary book ever written.” Certainly nothing has appeared in print subsequently to replace it in this category. The present edition is still the admirable translation from the German by Steven T. Byington, edited by James J. Martin (author of Men Against the State (L.B.C., 1957) and editor of Paul Eltzbacher, Anarchism (L.B.C., 1960)), for the purpose of eliminating minor stylistic awkwardness, without changing an iota of Stirner’s thought or intent. Furthermore, this edition is the only one ever published in which Stirner’s numerous literary and historical references and allusions are fully annotated, an assistance to contemporary readers of no little importance or service.

A careful and sober reading of The Ego and His Own may reveal to the perspicacious the corroboration of Stirner to be found in some modern psychologists, such as Trigant Burrow, Carl Jung, Otto Rank and particularly Erich Fromm, especially in view of Stirner’s stress on what has become known in our time as “the integration of personality.” The debt of modern “philosophers of self’ such as Martin Buber and some existentialists is even more obvious.


1963

Publisher Libertarian Book Club
Translator: Steven T. Byington
Introduction: James J. Martin
Index: X
City/Country
Size: xx Pages: xx
Title The Ego and His Own: The Case of the Individual Against Authority

UoE Notes:
The paperback edition of the LBC book is identical in content, but the cover is merely a duplication of the title page instead of using the illustration produced for the cover of the hardback by Harry Rifkin.


NoCoverAvailable1971

Publisher: Jonathan Cape
Translator: Steven T. Byington
Introduction: John Carroll
Index: No
City/Country: UK
Size: 5.75×8.25″  Pages: 266
Title: Max Stirner: The Ego and His Own
Cover price: $xxx

UoE Notes:
As far as we can tell, these “Roots of the Right” books began in the UK.

Back Cover/Inside Flap Copy:
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1971

EgoCover-1971-Harper&Row

Publisher: Harper & Row
Translator: Steven T. Byington
Introduction: John Carroll
Index: No
City/Country: New York/USA
Size: 5.75×8.25″  Pages: 266
Title: Max Stirner: The Ego and His Own
Cover price: $7.95

UoE Notes:
Part of the “Roots of the Right” series. This is an abridged/altered edition of Der Einzige, and includes sections from Stirner’s other writings.

Inside Flap Copy:
The life of the nineteenth-century anarchist philosopher Max Stirner was notable for one outstanding event: the writing of The Ego and His Own. This classic text, almost unavailable in English today, anticipated and influenced many prominent, psychological, philosophical and political theories of the last hundred years.
A long and vigorous monologue exploring the foundations of the ego, the book was regarded by Marx—who wrote a fourhundred-page reply to Stirner—as the most dangerous of polemics against socialism. The intensity and persistence of Stirner’s revaluation of life led to psychological insights, making him an important precursor of Nietzsche and Freud. Stirner’s egoist philosophy, contra every type of moral and social order, disinherits him from any political tradition. But his savagely penetrating critiques of liberalism and socialism generate ideas which were readily incorporated into fascist ideology. Mussolini, for one, claimed to have been greatly indebted to him. Moreover, there is contemporary relevance in a new look at this strangely neglected thinker : he presents the most fully-developed case against all supra-individual authority. Already in Stirner can be found the rhetoric of ‘doing your own thing’ and of ‘repressive tolerance’.
John Carroll’s selection from this extraordinary book, presenting in an easily assimilable form the essence of Stirner’s ideas, is an invaluable work for all students of politics and philosophy.

 


1973

EgoCover-1973-Dover

Publisher: Dover
Translator: Steven T. Byington
Introduction: James J. Martin
Translator’s Preface: Steven T. Byington
Index: No
City/Country: New York/USA
Size: 5.25×8.5″  Pages: 366
Cover design: Theodore Menten
Title: The Ego and His Own: The Case of the Individual Against Authority

UoE Notes:
The copyright page notes that this edition is “an unabridged and corrected republication of the English translation published by the Libertarian Book Club in 1963.”

Back cover copy:
“Nothing is more to me than myself!” rings Max Stirner’s declaration at the beginning of this libertarian classic that set about to level one of the first and most serious arguments against government. religion, morality, or any force that tends to threaten human liberty.
Stirner begins with an examination of “ego” in a single man, then traces the subjugation of ego from ancient times to the nineteenth century. Nothing escapes his indictment: the ancient philosophers, Christianity, monarchism, the bourgeois state; all have only fettered Man with laws, morality and obligations. A revolution does away with one evil only to replace it with another, and Stirner predicted (years before Marx’s Manifesto was even published) that socialism would create one of the most oppressive totalitarian states ever.
For the political scientist and philosopher The Ego and His Own is essential reading. For those concerned about the encroachment of authority upon individual liberty, Stirner delineates a philosophy of self against authority that, whether agreed with or not, is unsurpassed in its scope. This volume in the Dover series on the history of social protest has been called by James Huneker, “The most revolutionary book ever written.”
Unabridged, corrected reprinting of the 1963 English edition. Annotations and an introduction by James J. Martin. Translated from the 1845 German edition by Steven T. Byington. xviii + 366pp. 51/2 x 81/2. 22897-5 Paperbound


1982

12736098_10208979996837323_1216962266_n

Publisher: Rebel Press
Translator: Steven T. Byington
Introduction: S.E. Parker
Index: X

City/Country: UK
Size: xx Pages: xx
Cover design: xx

Title: The Ego and Its Own: The Case of the Individual Against Authority

UoE Notes:
One source says: “Apart from Parker’s intro, it’s a photo-reproduction of the good ol’ Libertarian BC edition.”

Back Cover Copy:

 


1982

EgoCover-1982-WesternWorldPress

Publisher: Western World Press
Translator: Steven T. Byington
Introduction: James J. Martin
Translator’s Preface: Steven T. Byington
Index: No
City/Country: Sun City, CA, USA
Size: 5.25×8″ Pages: 366
Cover design: Clifford Harper
Title: The Ego and His Own: The Case of the Individual Against Authority

UoE Notes:
This edition is a duplication of the Libertarian Book Club edition in paperback form.

 

 


1993

Ego-1993-RebelPress-Cover

Publisher: Rebel Press
Translator: Steven T. Byington
Introduction: S.E. Parker
Translator’s Preface: Steven T. Byington
Index: No
City/Country: London, UK
Size: 5.25×8″ Pages: 366
Cover design: Clifford Harper
Title: The Ego and Its Own: The Case of the Individual Against Authority

UoE Notes:
One source says: “Apart from Parker’s intro, it’s a photo-reproduction of the good ol’ Libertarian BC edition.”


Ego-1994-LaissezFaireAudio-Cover1994

Publisher: Laissez Faire Audio
Read by: Jeff Riggenbach
Translator: 
Steven T. Byington
Introduction: James J. Martin
Translator’s Preface: Steven T. Byington
Index: Yes
City/Country: San Francisco, CA, USA
Size: 9.25×10″ (case) Pages: n/a
Title: The Ego and His Own: The Case of the Individual Against Authority

UoE Notes:
The audiobook has the introduction attributed to “James S. Maston,” though it is the same James J. Martin introduction first published in 1963. It appears Mr. Riggenbach/Laissez Faire used the 1982 Western World Press edition as a source, as the material read at the beginning of the tape is truncated the same way.

Originally published as ten 90 minute audio cassettes in a plastic clamshell case.


1995

EgoCover-1995-Cambridge

Publisher: Cambridge
Translator: Steven T. Byington
Editor: David Leopold
Introduction: David Leopold
Index: Both “Subject” and “Name” index.
City/Country: Cambridge, UK/New York, USA
Size: 5.375×8.375  Pages: 386
Title: The Ego and Its Own

UoE Notes:
Part of the “Cambridge Tests in the History of Political Thought” series.

Back cover copy:

Max Stirner’s The Ego and Its Own has been called ‘the most revolutionary [book] ever written’. First published in 1844, Stirner’s distinctive and powerful polemic sounded the death knell of left Hegelianism, with its attack on Ludwig Feuerbach, Bruno Bauer, Moses Hess, and others. It contains an enduring and strikingly written critique of both liberalism and socialism from the perspective of an extreme and eccentric individualism. Karl Marx was only one of many contemporaries provoked into a lengthy rebuttal of Stirner’s argument. More recently, Stirner has been variously portrayed as a nihilistic anarchist, a precursor of Nietzsche, and a forerunner of existentialism.
This edition of Stirner’s work comprises a revised version of Steven Byington’s much-praised translation, together with an introduction and notes on the historical background to Stirner’s text.


2005

41wTZnWreAL._SX313_BO1,204,203,200_

Publisher: Dover
Translator: Steven T. Byington
Introduction: James J. Martin
Index: No
City/Country: Mineola, New York/USA
Size: 5.5×8.5″  Pages: 366
Cover design: John M. Alves
Title: The Ego and His Own: The Case of the Individual Against Authority

UoE Notes:
Dover redesigned the cover of their edition and did the absolute least amount of work when they re-released “Ego” in 2005.

Back cover states:

“Dover (2005) unabridged republication of the 1963 English edition. Annotations and an introduction by James J. Martin. Translated from the 1845 German edition by Steven T. Byington.”